Dave Gray, Liminal Thinking

Book cover of Liminal Thinking by Dave Gray

“Most boundaries are convenient fictions. What divides the people who are “on” a team from those who are not? What separates one company department or division from another, or an employee from a customer? Boundaries give life structure, which makes us comfortable. But they can also be shifted, rethought, reframed, and reorganized.”

Excerpt From: Gray, Dave. “Liminal Thinking.”

Nir Eyal, What do you do when someone ‘steals’ your amazing idea?

Most of the bad startup ideas I hear are bad not because they’re under threat of someone’s stealing the idea, but because the founder doesn’t know what he or she doesn’t know.

What do you do when someone ‘steals’ your amazing idea? – InVision Blog
By Nir Eyal on blog.invisionapp.com
Open

Evernote Cuts the Only Killer Feature It Had Left

Evernote emailed me today to let me know that they are going to limit free accounts to only 2 devices.

Evernote announces a feature cut for free members.

This is a real bummer as I’ve been an Evernote fan for a very long time. In the last few years, several strong competitors have emerged, not least of which is the free iOS Notes app that ships with every device Apple sells. I’ve stayed with Evernote because they got one important thing right early on – ubiquity. It didn’t matter where I was or what device I was using, I knew I could get my ideas in and out of Evernote. Continue reading “Evernote Cuts the Only Killer Feature It Had Left”

The Failure of the Segway

Critics jumped on the dorky aspect and the high price, but those weren’t the dooming factors. Early adopters often put up with cost and ridicule for innovations that meet real needs. But no one needs a Segway.

Erika Hall, Just Enough Research

Thought this was a great point, especially on this, the eve of the alleged iWatch.

Beware the ESG Performance Gap

In the May 2013 edition of HBR, Robert G. Eccles and George Serafeim demonstrate the need for companies to incorporate environmental, social and governance (ESG) into their core strategic innovation initiatives.

The ESG performance gap shows the effects of non-strategic implementations.
As environmental, social and governance (ESG) improves, a firm’s financial performance declines — unless ESG is incorporated through strategic and substantial innovation.

At MX Conference 2013, “triple bottom line” was an idea that came up repeatedly. I thought at the time that companies seeking to show performance in terms of profit, people and the planet are bound to venture into misguided efforts. Simply slapping a layer of ESG initiatives doesn’t make a corporation not-evil. And as Eccles and Serafeim show, the increased cost of these efforts will diminish financial performance over time because of the increased cost.

The only exception is for companies that treat ESG as a core part of their innovation work. Firms that make strategic decisions to sensibly innovate their businesses in ways that incorporate ESG will improve their triple bottom line, while most companies are sure to abandon their ESG efforts as they fail to realize return on the investment. I hate to be cynical, but ESG is sure to wind up like every sitcom that added a kid as their ratings faltered.